The online interactive magazine of the Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence

Will Machine Learning Outgrow Human Labeling?

by Mike Schaekermann, Christopher M. Homan, Lora Aroyo, Praveen Paritosh, Kurt Bollacker, Chris Welty

Some machine learning (ML) rhetoric seems to imply an assumption or expectation that, at some point, machines will outgrow the need for human labeled data. Today’s reliance on such labeling is a sort of dirty little secret of AI, and some view it as a necessary means to a larger end. This bet is an attempt to formalize that attitude into a concrete question, whose answer can be measured over time.

Adaptive Learning Technologies

By Nicola Capuano & Santi Caballe

In his annual survey, the learning technology expert Donald Taylor asks more than 2,000 industry experts from different countries to estimate the most popular topics in workplace learning1. Since 2017, adaptive learning has always been at the top of this ranking, barely overtaken by learning analytics only in 2020. From the higher education perspective, the EDUCAUSE Horizon Report 20182 included adaptive learning among the six most impactful educational technologies in the five-year horizon for higher education. This is confirmed by a recent survey3 where many chief academic officers consider adaptive learning as one of the most promising initiatives for improving the quality of student learning.

Patrick Henry Winston: A Recollection

by Kenneth D. Forbus, Northwestern University

I first met Patrick when I started working at the MIT AI Lab in Fall of1973.  I was a freshman, doing a project with David Marr that was a step on the path to the Primal Sketch.  It was like a dream come true to work there. At the time, Patrick had just taken over as director, despite being an assistant professor. This was an unusual burden, but he handled it well, ensuring that it ran more smoothly while maintaining an exciting intellectual environment.

The Reproducibility Crisis Is Real

by Odd Erik Gundersen

The reproducibility crisis is real, and it is not only psychology that has to deal with it. All sciences are affected. The field of AI is not an exception.

Patrick Henry Winston: In Memoriam

By Mark Finlayson, Florida International University 

“What do you say?” Patrick’s enunciated greeting would ring out, ritual-like, as I presented myself at the threshold to 32-251. His blond hair poking up from behind his monitor, I could hear in his voice whether he wore his characteristic wry smile. My visits were unscheduled: I would come over from my neighboring office when I saw his light on and door open. I spoke with him almost every work day for nearly twelve years, in conversations long and short, mostly about research: science, engineering, academics, artificial intelligence, cognition, or the latest paper or proposal we were writing.

Latest from AI Magazine

Spring 2022: NSF Convergence Accelerator

Spring 2022: NSF Convergence Accelerator

Highlights from the current issue:  NSF Convergence Accelerator Transitioning research to practice for societal impact The Third AI Summer Exploring recurring themes in AI history and the future of AI Challenges in ConvAI Evaluation Problems behind evaluating creative...

Ask-Me-Anything:

AI Experts Answer Your Questions

AI experts answer your questions! Your questions will be submitted to these guests and a video will be recorded with their answers and posted on the Interactive AI Magazine and in the weekly AI Alert.

For our third AMA, we have Dr. Ashok Goel, a Professor in the School of Interactive Computing at Georgia Institute of Technology and the Chief Scientist with Georgia Tech’s Center for 21st Century Universities. He conducts research into cognitive systems at the intersection of AI and cognitive science with a focus on computational design and creativity, and recently, also on AI in education and education in AI. During 2016-2021, he was the Editor-in-Chief of AAAI’s AI Magazine and led the launch of the Interactive AI Magazine. He is a Fellow of AAAI and a recipient of AAAI’s Outstanding AI Educator Award. Ashok is the Executive Director of the NSF’s National AI Institute for Adult Learning and Online Education.

 

For our second AMA, we have Prof. Toby Walsh, an ARC Laureate Fellow and Scientia Professor of AI at UNSW and CSIRO Data61, and adjunct professor at QUT. He is a strong advocate for limits to ensure AI is used to improve our lives, having spoken at the UN, and to heads of state, parliamentary bodies, company boards and many other bodies on this topic. He is a Fellow of the Australia Academy of Science, and was named on the international “Who’s Who in AI” list of influencers. He has authored two books on AI for a general audience, the most recent entitled “2062: The World that AI Made”.

For our first AMA, we have the co-editors of AI Magazine, Drs. Brent Venable and Odd Erik Gundersen.

Dr. Brent Venable joined the Florida Institute for Human & Machine Cognition (IHMC) in August 2012. She is also professor of computer science at University of West Florida (UWF). Since 2019 she is the director of the newly established IHMC-UWF PhD program in Intelligent Systems and Robotics. Her research is dedicated to providing a solid framework for the design and deployment of intelligent systems able to reason about preferences. Research areas: reasoning about preferences, multi-agent systems, constraint-based temporal reasoning, AI for social good.

Dr. Odd Erik Gundersen is an adjunct associate professor at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology and the Chief AI Officer at TrønderEnergi AS, a Norwegian renewable energy company. Gundersen has applied AI in industry, mostly for startups, since 2006. Currently, he is investigating how AI can be applied in the renewable energy sector and for driver training. On late evenings he ponders how research in AI can be made reproducible. Research areas: AI for renewable energy, AI-based simulators for driver training, reproducible AI.

Recent Posts

ICPRAM 2021 Conference Report

ICPRAM 2021 (10th International Conference on Pattern Recognition Applications and Methods) received 97 paper submissions from 30 countries. To evaluate each submission, a double‐blind paper review was performed by the Program Committee. After a stringent selection process, 21 papers were published and presented as full papers, i.e. completed work (12 pages/25’ oral presentation), 53 papers were accepted as short papers (28 as oral presentation and 25 as poster presentation).

Winter 2021: Innovative Applications of AI

Vol 42 No 4
Highlights from this issue of AI Magazine: The AAAI Presidential Address and reflections on whether AI will write scientific papers in the future. Automating Conversation Review: designing a scalable AI system to identify miscommunications. Agents of Exploration and Discovery: developing agents to conduct scientific research in novel environments

 

 


 

AI Magazine Archives

Winter 2021: Innovative Applications of AI

Vol 42 No 4
Highlights from this issue of AI Magazine: The AAAI Presidential Address and reflections on whether AI will write scientific papers in the future. Automating Conversation Review: designing a scalable AI system to identify miscommunications. Agents of Exploration and Discovery: developing agents to conduct scientific research in novel environments