The online interactive magazine of the Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence

Bridging Case-Based Reasoning, DL and XAI at the First Virtual ICCBR Conference (ICCBR2020)

Ian Watson, Rosina O Weber, David Leake

Case-based reasoning is reasoning from experience, solving new problems and interpreting new situations by retrieving and adapting prior cases. The Twenty-Eight International Conference on Case-Based Reasoning (ICCBR2020) was held from June 8-12, 2020, with program chairs Ian Watson and Rosina Weber.  The conference was originally scheduled for Salamanca, Spain, a World Heritage site, under the auspices of local chair Juan Manuel Corchado and the University of Salamanca.   Its theme, “CBR Across Bridges”, reflected the goal of bringing together researchers and practitioners with relevant work across various AI areas.   Before the conference, the pandemic struck, with tragic effects.   The conference chairs resolved to continue with a safe alternative: the first virtual ICCBR.   With researchers unable to travel, the virtual conference not only bridged AI areas but geographic ones:  141 conference attendees participated from 23 countries. 

Looking Back, Looking Ahead: Humans, Ethics, and AI

By Ashok Goel

Concerns about ethics of AI are older than AI itself. The phrase “artificial intelligence” was first used by McCarthy and colleagues in 1955 (McCarthy et al. 1955). However, in 1920 Capek already had published his science fiction play in which robots suffering abuse rebelled against human tyranny (Capek 1920), and by 1942, Asimov had proposed his famous three “laws of robotics” about robots not harming humans, not harming other robots, and not harming themselves (Asimov 1942). During much of the last century, when AI was mostly confined to research laboratories, concerns about ethics of AI were mostly limited to futurist writers of fiction and fantasy. In this century, as AI has begun to penetrate almost all aspects of life, worries about AI ethics have started permeating mainstream media. In this column, I briefly examine three broad classes of ethical concerns about AI, and then highlight another concern that has not yet received as much attention.

AAAI Honors High School Students at ISEF

AAAI is pleased to announce the winners of the recent AAAI Special Awards at the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair, held virtually May 16-21, 2021. T

Report on the Thirty-Fourth International Florida Artificial Intelligence Research Society Conference (FLAIRS-34)

By Eric Bell, Fazel Keshtkar, Roman Barták, and Keith Brawner

The Thirty-Third International Florida Artificial Intelligence Research Society
Conference (FLAIRS-34) was to be held May 17-19, 2021, at the Double Tree Ocean
Point Resort and Spa in North Miami Beach, Florida, USA. Due to COVID-19 pandemic
and travel restriction, the conference held both virtual and in-person. The planned
conference events included tutorials, invited speakers, special tracks, and presentations
of papers, posters, and awards. The conference chair was Keith Brawner from the Army
Research Laboratory. The program co-chairs were Roman Barták from Charles
University, Prague, and Eric Bell, USA. The special tracks were coordinated by Fazel
Keshtkar from St John’s University.

Looking Back, Looking Ahead: Symbolic versus Connectionist AI

By Ashok Goel; School of Interactive Computing, Georgia Institute of Technology

Like much of the AI community, I have watched the ongoing discussion between symbolic AI and connectionist AI with fascination. While symbolic AI posits the use of knowledge in reasoning and learning as critical to producing intelligent behavior, connectionist AI postulates that learning of associations from data (with little or no prior knowledge) is crucial for understanding behavior. The recent debate between the two AI paradigms has been prompted by advances in connectionist AI since the turn of the century that have significant applications.

Latest from AI Magazine

Cover of AI Magazine issue 267AI: The Social Disruption – Interdisciplinary discourse on AI innovations and disruptions in the 20th century.

Vol. 42 No. 1

Ask-Me-Anything – AI Experts Answer Your Questions

Submit your questions to our first Ask-Me-Anything (AMA) with guests Drs. Brent Venable and Odd Erik Gundersen, co-editors of AI Magazine.

Recent Posts

Bridging Case-Based Reasoning, DL and XAI at the First Virtual ICCBR Conference (ICCBR2020)

Ian Watson, Rosina O Weber, David Leake

Case-based reasoning is reasoning from experience, solving new problems and interpreting new situations by retrieving and adapting prior cases. The Twenty-Eight International Conference on Case-Based Reasoning (ICCBR2020) was held from June 8-12, 2020, with program chairs Ian Watson and Rosina Weber.  The conference was originally scheduled for Salamanca, Spain, a World Heritage site, under the auspices of local chair Juan Manuel Corchado and the University of Salamanca.   Its theme, “CBR Across Bridges”, reflected the goal of bringing together researchers and practitioners with relevant work across various AI areas.   Before the conference, the pandemic struck, with tragic effects.   The conference chairs resolved to continue with a safe alternative: the first virtual ICCBR.   With researchers unable to travel, the virtual conference not only bridged AI areas but geographic ones:  141 conference attendees participated from 23 countries. 

Looking Back, Looking Ahead: Humans, Ethics, and AI

By Ashok Goel

Concerns about ethics of AI are older than AI itself. The phrase “artificial intelligence” was first used by McCarthy and colleagues in 1955 (McCarthy et al. 1955). However, in 1920 Capek already had published his science fiction play in which robots suffering abuse rebelled against human tyranny (Capek 1920), and by 1942, Asimov had proposed his famous three “laws of robotics” about robots not harming humans, not harming other robots, and not harming themselves (Asimov 1942). During much of the last century, when AI was mostly confined to research laboratories, concerns about ethics of AI were mostly limited to futurist writers of fiction and fantasy. In this century, as AI has begun to penetrate almost all aspects of life, worries about AI ethics have started permeating mainstream media. In this column, I briefly examine three broad classes of ethical concerns about AI, and then highlight another concern that has not yet received as much attention.

To the AI Community

COVID-19 Update: A Special Message to the AI Community from AAAI

AAAI would like to wish all of our members, affiliated volunteers, and the greater international AI community all the best during this most challenging time. Read more on AAAI.org..

AAAI Statement Condemning Racism and Calling to Action

As a scientific society, AAAI is against the violence against Black people and the systemic racism that has gone unaddressed for too long. Read more on AAAI.org…

Letter from the Editor

By Ashok Goel

We are delighted to bring the brand new Interactive AI Magazine to you, a digital and expanded version of AI Magazine.

 

 


 

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